Hawks In Georgia

Spotting 6 Types Of Hawks In Georgia (With Pictures)

Georgia has lots of cool animals, and guess what? Many kinds of hawks lives in georgia too! Hawks are super cool because they have big wings, sharp claws, and they’re really good at hunting.

Because Georgia has nice weather and lots of different places like forests and fields, hawks love living there. This makes Georgia a great spot for people who love watching birds, especially hawks!

In Georgia, you can find all sorts of hawks, like the Broad-Winged Hawk and the Red-Tailed Hawk. They’re all over the state! Watching them in their homes is so fun and you can learn a lot about how they act and hunt.

So, in this article, we’re going to talk about hawks in Georgia. We’ll tell you where to look for them, how to know which hawk is which, and some really neat facts about these awesome birds.

Whether you’re someone who knows a lot about birds or you’re just starting to get interested in wildlife, this guide will teach you all about the amazing world of hawks in Georgia.

1. RED-TAILED HAWK

The Red-shouldered Hawk has reddish-orange underparts and shoulders, with black and white on its wings and tail. Both male and female hawks look similar, but the girls are usually bigger. When they’re young, they’re brown on top with dark streaks on their light bellies.

RED-TAILED HAWK

When they fly, you can spot them by their long black and white tail and long wings with a pale crescent shape near the tips.

These hawks like to eat snakes, frogs, and other small critters. They hunt by sitting on a branch and then diving down to catch their prey on the ground.

They make their nests out of sticks up high in trees, usually in wooded areas near water.

You can find Red-shouldered Hawks in lots of different forests and wooded places in parts of Canada, the eastern USA, California, Oregon, and Mexico.

2. RED-SHOULDERED HAWK

The Red-shouldered Hawk is a bird that sticks around in Georgia and lots of the eastern U.S. all year long. They eat lots of different things like small mammals, birds, snakes, and frogs, which helps keep nature in balance.

RED-SHOULDERED HAWK

These hawks really like hanging out in forests and woods, and they build their nests there too. It’s cool because they often use the same nest over and over again each year, showing how much they love their homes.

Over the last 50 years or so, more and more Red-shouldered Hawks have been showing up. Their population has grown about 2% every year, which is pretty neat. But, there’s a big problem: people cutting down forests. This messes up where they live and have babies.

Even though they’re called Red-shouldered Hawks, they’re not just red on their shoulders. Actually, they’re red on their bellies and chests too, making them look pretty unique.

3. BROAD-WINGED HAWK

The Broad-winged Hawk lives in Georgia and all across the eastern U.S. They’re famous for their big migrations, where they fly together in huge groups called ‘kettles.’

BROAD-WINGED HAWK

In Georgia, you can see Broad-winged Hawks a lot from April to October, which is when they have babies and take care of their homes.

These hawks usually have one set of babies each year, with around 1 to 5 eggs in each nest. Both the male and female work together to build the nest.

They’re really protective of their nests, making sure they’re far away from other birds like them. Broad-winged Hawks eat small animals, snakes, frogs, and sometimes even other birds, which helps keep Georgia’s ecosystem balanced.

4. SHARP-SHINNED HAWK

The Sharp-shinned Hawk takes the crown as the tiniest hawk species not only in Georgia but also across North America. Its presence is quite common throughout the United States, including our state, Georgia. Despite this widespread presence, it’s noteworthy that they don’t breed everywhere within the state; instead, they journey far north each year for breeding purposes.

SHARP-SHINNED HAWK

Moreover, while the Sharp-shinned Hawk may be small, its adaptability to various environments echoes that of the Cooper’s hawk, showcasing its ability to thrive in diverse habitats.

Every year, these hawks embark on a northward migration for breeding. During this time, they are notorious for lurking around backyard areas and bird feeders, particularly targeting songbirds for their meals.

If you happen to spot one of these hawks in your backyard, it’s advisable to temporarily remove your feeders for a few days. This gesture can help encourage the hawk to move on before reintroducing the feeders.

5. COOPER’S HAWK

Cooper’s Hawks are not just your average birds; they’re actually pretty big compared to their hawk cousins like the Sharp-shinned Hawk. Besides, you can easily tell them apart by checking out their markings and plumage patterns. They’re all over Georgia and pretty much everywhere in North America throughout the year.

COOPER’S HAWK

Plus, these hawks are masters of hunting, especially in places with lots of trees and even in cities. Moreover, they’re super skilled at navigating through forests and urban areas. This talent helps them thrive in different environments, which is pretty cool.

Also, just like Sharp-shinned Hawks, Cooper’s Hawks are famous for lurking around bird feeders and snacking on other birds. They mainly hang out in forests and wooded areas, but they’re also down to nest in the suburbs or even your backyard.

6. NORTHERN HARRIER

The Northern Harrier is a cool bird that flies around. Its scientific name is Circus hudsonius. It can live up to 12 years, which is a long time for a bird! Plus, it’s not too big, only about 18.1-19.7 inches (46-50 cm) long. That’s like the size of a ruler!

Also, it doesn’t weigh too much, just 10.6-26.5 ounces (300-750 grams). Its wingspan is pretty wide, around 40.2-46.5 inches (102-118 cm). Besides this, it’s not in danger at all; in fact, it’s considered “Least Concern.” That means it’s doing just fine in the world

NORTHERN HARRIER

The Northern Harrier stands out among hawks in North America because it’s the only harrier variety found here. While it breeds as far up as Canada, it heads south for the winter, chilling in places like Georgia. These birds prefer hanging out and hunting in fields and marshes.

Just like owls, Northern Harriers use both their keen hearing and sharp vision to hunt down their meals. They even have this sneaky move where they drown their bigger prey. Plus, here’s a fun fact: male Northern Harriers can be quite the players, sometimes having up to five female partners at once, though usually, they stick with one or two.

So, if you’re in Georgia or anywhere in North America, keep an eye out for these hawk buddies. They’re like the owl of the hawk world, relying on their sharp senses to rule the hunting game.

Blackbirds (Icteridae)
What Eats Birds?
Blue Birds in Pa (Pennsylvania)
Owls in Alabama

Q1: What is the most common hawk in Georgia?

The Red-tailed Hawk is the most common hawk species in Georgia.

Q2: What is the difference between a hawk and a falcon in Georgia?

Hawks generally have broader wings and soar more often, while falcons have pointed wings and tend to hunt by diving.

Q3: Are hawks protected in Georgia?

Yes, hawks are protected under state and federal laws in Georgia.

Q4: What are hawks famous for?

Hawks are famous for their keen eyesight, powerful hunting abilities, and impressive aerial acrobatics.

Mya Bambrick

I am a lifelong bird lover and nature enthusiast. I admire birds for their beauty, diversity, and intelligence. Birding is more than a hobby for me; it is a way of life. Therefore, I created this website to provide better and quality information about bird species. You know there are many bird species in the world right now. I started a path to introduce you to birds one by one.

Add comment